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Markdown Cheatsheet

This page outlines all stuff available by installing the base Python-Markdown (comes with MkDocs) and the additional bundle PyMdown Extensions.

Headings

### The 3rd level

#### The 4th level

##### The 5th level

###### The 6th level

## Headings <small>with secondary text</small>

### The 3rd level <small>with secondary text</small>

#### The 4th level <small>with secondary text</small>

##### The 5th level <small>with secondary text</small>

###### The 6th level <small>with secondary text</small>

The 3rd level

The 4th level

The 5th level
The 6th level

Headings with secondary text

The 3rd level with secondary text

The 4th level with secondary text

The 5th level with secondary text
The 6th level with secondary text

Emphasis

Emphasis, aka italics, with *asterisks* or _underscores_.

Strong emphasis, aka bold, with **asterisks** or __underscores__.

Combined emphasis with **asterisks and _underscores_**.

Strikethrough uses two tildes. ~~Scratch this.~~

Emphasis, aka italics, with asterisks or underscores.

Strong emphasis, aka bold, with asterisks or underscores.

Combined emphasis with asterisks and underscores.

Strikethrough uses two tildes. ~~Scratch this.~~

Lists

(In this example, leading and trailing spaces are shown with with dots: ⋅)

1. First ordered list item
2. Another item
⋅⋅⋅⋅* Unordered sub-list. 
⋅⋅⋅⋅* Item 2
⋅⋅⋅⋅* Item 3
1. Actual numbers don't matter, just that it's a number
⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Ordered sub-list
⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Ordered subsub-list
⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Item 2
⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Item 3
⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Item 2
⋅⋅⋅⋅1. Item 3
4. And another item.

⋅⋅⋅⋅You can have properly indented paragraphs within list items. Notice the blank line above, and the leading spaces (at least one, but we'll use three here to also align the raw Markdown).

⋅⋅⋅⋅To have a line break without a paragraph, you will need to use two trailing spaces.⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅Note that this line is separate, but within the same paragraph.⋅⋅
⋅⋅⋅⋅(This is contrary to the typical GFM line break behaviour, where trailing spaces are not required.)

* Unordered list can use asterisks
- Or minuses
+ Or pluses
  1. First ordered list item
  2. Another item
    • Unordered sub-list.
    • Item 2
    • Item 3
  3. Actual numbers don't matter, just that it's a number
    1. Ordered sub-list
      1. Ordered subsub-list
      2. Item 2
      3. Item 3
    2. Item 2
    3. Item 3
  4. And another item.

    You can have properly indented paragraphs within list items. Notice the blank line above, and the leading spaces (at least one, but we'll use three here to also align the raw Markdown).

    To have a line break without a paragraph, you will need to use two trailing spaces.
    Note that this line is separate, but within the same paragraph.
    (This is contrary to the typical GFM line break behaviour, where trailing spaces are not required.)

  5. Unordered list can use asterisks

  6. Or minuses
  7. Or pluses

There are two ways to create links.

[I'm an inline-style link](https://www.google.com)

[I'm an inline-style link with title](https://www.google.com "Google's Homepage")

[I'm a reference-style link][Arbitrary case-insensitive reference text]

[I'm a relative reference to a repository file](../blob/master/LICENSE)

[You can use numbers for reference-style link definitions][1]

Or leave it empty and use the [link text itself].

URLs and URLs in angle brackets will automatically get turned into links. 
http://www.example.com or <http://www.example.com> and sometimes 
example.com (but not on Github, for example).

Some text to show that the reference links can follow later.

[arbitrary case-insensitive reference text]: https://www.mozilla.org
[1]: http://slashdot.org
[link text itself]: http://www.reddit.com

I'm an inline-style link

I'm an inline-style link with title

I'm a reference-style link

I'm a relative reference to a repository file

You can use numbers for reference-style link definitions

Or leave it empty and use the link text itself.

URLs and URLs in angle brackets will automatically get turned into links. http://www.example.com or http://www.example.com and sometimes example.com (but not on Github, for example).

Some text to show that the reference links can follow later.

Images

Here's our logo (hover to see the title text):

Inline-style: 
![alt text](https://github.com/adam-p/markdown-here/raw/master/src/common/images/icon48.png "Logo Title Text 1")

Reference-style: 
![alt text][logo]

[logo]: https://github.com/adam-p/markdown-here/raw/master/src/common/images/icon48.png "Logo Title Text 2"

Here's our logo (hover to see the title text):

Inline-style: alt text

Reference-style: alt text

Code and Syntax Highlighting

Code blocks are part of the Markdown spec, but syntax highlighting isn't. However, many renderers -- like Github's and Markdown Here -- support syntax highlighting. Which languages are supported and how those language names should be written will vary from renderer to renderer. Markdown Here supports highlighting for dozens of languages (and not-really-languages, like diffs and HTTP headers); to see the complete list, and how to write the language names, see the highlight.js demo page.

Inline `code` has `back-ticks around` it.

Inline code has back-ticks around it.

Blocks of code are either fenced by lines with three back-ticks ```, or are indented with four spaces. I recommend only using the fenced code blocks -- they're easier and only these support syntax highlighting.

var s = "JavaScript syntax highlighting";
alert(s);
s = "Python syntax highlighting"
print s
No language indicated, so no syntax highlighting in Markdown Here (varies on Github). 
But let's throw in a <b>tag</b>.

Even tabbed code example for different language are possible:

#!/bin/bash
STR="Hello World!"
echo $STR
#include

int main(void) {
  printf("hello, world\n");
}
#include <iostream>

int main() {
  std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";
  return 0;
}
using System;

class Program {
  static void Main(string[] args) {
    Console.WriteLine("Hello, world!");
  }
}

Tables

Tables aren't part of the core Markdown spec, but they are part of GFM and Markdown Here supports them. They are an easy way of adding tables to your email -- a task that would otherwise require copy-pasting from another application.

Colons can be used to align columns.

| Tables        | Are           | Cool  |
| ------------- |:-------------:| -----:|
| col 3 is      | right-aligned | $1600 |
| col 2 is      | centered      |   $12 |
| zebra stripes | are neat      |    $1 |

There must be at least 3 dashes separating each header cell.
The outer pipes (|) are optional, and you don't need to make the 
raw Markdown line up prettily. You can also use inline Markdown.

Markdown | Less | Pretty
--- | --- | ---
*Still* | `renders` | **nicely**
1 | 2 | 3

Colons can be used to align columns.

Tables Are Cool
col 3 is right-aligned $1600
col 2 is centered $12
zebra stripes are neat $1

There must be at least 3 dashes separating each header cell. The outer pipes (|) are optional, and you don't need to make the raw Markdown line up prettily. You can also use inline Markdown.

Markdown Less Pretty
Still renders nicely
1 2 3

Blockquotes

> Blockquotes are very handy in email to emulate reply text.
> This line is part of the same quote.

Quote break.

> This is a very long line that will still be quoted properly when it wraps. Oh boy let's keep writing to make sure this is long enough to actually wrap for everyone. Oh, you can *put* **Markdown** into a blockquote. 

Blockquotes are very handy in email to emulate reply text. This line is part of the same quote.

Quote break.

This is a very long line that will still be quoted properly when it wraps. Oh boy let's keep writing to make sure this is long enough to actually wrap for everyone. Oh, you can put Markdown into a blockquote.

Blockquote nesting is possible:

> **Sed aliquet**, neque at rutrum mollis, neque nisi tincidunt nibh, vitae
  faucibus lacus nunc at lacus. Nunc scelerisque, quam id cursus sodales, lorem
  [libero fermentum](#) urna, ut efficitur elit ligula et nunc.

> > Mauris dictum mi lacus, sit amet pellentesque urna vehicula fringilla.
    Ut sit amet placerat ante. Proin sed **elementum** __nulla__. Nunc vitae sem odio.
    Suspendisse ac eros arcu. Vivamus orci erat, volutpat a tempor et, rutrum.
    eu odio.

> > > `Suspendisse rutrum facilisis risus`, eu posuere neque commodo a.
      Interdum et malesuada fames ac ante ipsum primis in faucibus. Sed nec leo
      bibendum, sodales mauris ut, tincidunt massa.

Sed aliquet, neque at rutrum mollis, neque nisi tincidunt nibh, vitae faucibus lacus nunc at lacus. Nunc scelerisque, quam id cursus sodales, lorem libero fermentum urna, ut efficitur elit ligula et nunc.

Mauris dictum mi lacus, sit amet pellentesque urna vehicula fringilla. Ut sit amet placerat ante. Proin sed elementum nulla. Nunc vitae sem odio. Suspendisse ac eros arcu. Vivamus orci erat, volutpat a tempor et, rutrum. eu odio.

Suspendisse rutrum facilisis risus, eu posuere neque commodo a. Interdum et malesuada fames ac ante ipsum primis in faucibus. Sed nec leo bibendum, sodales mauris ut, tincidunt massa.

Other content blocks within a blockquote

Vestibulum vitae orci quis ante viverra ultricies ut eget turpis. Sed eu lectus dapibus, eleifend nulla varius, lobortis turpis. In ac hendrerit nisl, sit amet laoreet nibh.

var _extends = function(target) {
  for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {
    var source = arguments[i];
    for (var key in source) {
      target[key] = source[key];
    }
  }
  return target;
};

Praesent at :::js return target, sodales nibh vel, tempor felis. Fusce vel lacinia lacus. Suspendisse rhoncus nunc non nisi iaculis ultrices. Donec consectetur mauris non neque imperdiet, eget volutpat libero.

Inline HTML

You can also use raw HTML in your Markdown, and it'll mostly work pretty well.

Horizontal Rule

Three or more...

---

Hyphens

***

Asterisks

___

Underscores

Three or more...


Hyphens


Asterisks


Underscores

Line Breaks

My basic recommendation for learning how line breaks work is to experiment and discover -- hit <Enter> once (i.e., insert one newline), then hit it twice (i.e., insert two newlines), see what happens. You'll soon learn to get what you want. "Markdown Toggle" is your friend.

Here are some things to try out:

Here's a line for us to start with.

This line is separated from the one above by two newlines, so it will be a *separate paragraph*.

This line is also a separate paragraph, but...
This line is only separated by a single newline, so it's a separate line in the *same paragraph*.

Here's a line for us to start with.

This line is separated from the one above by two newlines, so it will be a separate paragraph.

This line is also begins a separate paragraph, but...
This line is only separated by a single newline, so it's a separate line in the same paragraph.

YouTube Videos

They can't be added directly but you can add an image with a link to the video like this:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=YOUTUBE_VIDEO_ID_HERE
" target="_blank"><img src="http://img.youtube.com/vi/YOUTUBE_VIDEO_ID_HERE/0.jpg" 
alt="IMAGE ALT TEXT HERE" width="240" height="180" border="10" /></a>

Or, in pure Markdown, but losing the image sizing and border:

[![IMAGE ALT TEXT HERE](http://img.youtube.com/vi/YOUTUBE_VIDEO_ID_HERE/0.jpg)](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOUTUBE_VIDEO_ID_HERE)

Admonition

!!! type "optional explicit title within double quotes"
    Any number of other indented markdown elements.

    This is the second paragraph.

Some title

Any number of other indented markdown elements.

This is the second paragraph.

And this is outside the admonition again.

If you don’t want a title, use a blank string "".

Don't do this at home!

rST suggests the following “types”: attention, caution, danger, error, hint, important, note, tip, and warning:

Some title

This is type note

Some title

This is type hint

Some title

This is type tip

Some title

This is type important

Some title

This is type attention

Some title

This is type caution

Some title

This is type warning

Some title

This is type danger

Some title

This is type error

Abbreviations

The HTML specification
is maintained by the W3C.

*[HTML]: Hyper Text Markup Language
*[W3C]:  World Wide Web Consortium

The HTML specification is maintained by the W3C.

Definition Lists

Apple
:   Pomaceous fruit of plants of the genus Malus in
    the family Rosaceae.

Orange
:   The fruit of an evergreen tree of the genus Citrus.
Apple
Pomaceous fruit of plants of the genus Malus in the family Rosaceae.
Orange
The fruit of an evergreen tree of the genus Citrus.

Footnotes

Footnotes[^1] have a label[^@#$%] and the footnote's content. Another Footnote[^anything]

[^1]: This is a footnote content. [^@#$%]: A footnote on the label: "@#$%". [^anything]: Another content

Critic Markup

There are five types of Critic marks:

  • Addition addition
  • Deletion deletion
  • Substitution thisthat
  • Comment I'm a comment
  • Highlight This is hilghlighted

This a sample for a exchangesubstitution.

When used in combination the marks can indicate more complex changes.

Don’t go around saying to people that  the world owes you a living. The
world owes you nothing. It was here first. OneOnly one thing is
impossible for God: To find any sense in any copyright law on the
planet. Truth is stranger than fictiontrue, but it is because
Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.

The above paragraphs should render to HTML in the following manner.

Don’t go around saying<del> to people that</del> the world owes you a
living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.
<del>One</del><ins>Only one</ins> thing is impossible for God: To find
<ins>any</ins> sense in any copyright law on the planet. <mark>Truth is
stranger than fiction</mark><span class=”critic comment”>true</span>, but it
is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.

License: CC-BY


Last update: 2022-09-26